Currently Available Low-Cost Epipen Alternatives Are NOT Safe!

 

In an emergency, an manual draw epinephrine injection kit is NOT an appropriate replacement for an autoinjector.

Additionally, the syringe based auto injectors such as Adrenaclick are NOT an ideal sub for a cartridge based autoinjector!

A cartridge-based autoinjector is the SAFEST and most SURE way to save lives in an anaphylactic emergency, and carrying anything else could cost even more lives. As it is, fewer than half of patients in a 2015 study were able to correctly administer epiniphrine using the brand-name autoinjector.

  1. For people who are not medical professionals, draw time on a manual injection is too slow. Seconds count, and an average parent trying to inject their child takes two and a half minutes to draw up.
  2. If you have having even a moderate reaction you will be too compromised to inject yourself with a manual draw. Anyone who has ever fumbled around looking for their asthma inhaler, benadryl, or even car keys to get to those things, knows this from experience. Trying to draw up, remove air bubbles, and then *remove your pants* to inject yourself during anaphylaxis is out of the question.
  3. The syringe based auto injectors such as the adrenaclick may not deliver a sufficient dosage of epi.  The adrenaclick delivers only 25.7% of intended dose while the Epipen cartridge-based injector delivers 74.3%.
  4. Syringe based solutions, either manual or auto injection, cannot reliably be used through clothing. Thick clothing such as denim will bend the needle and must be removed or cut away, costing seconds that could be the difference between life and death.

Related posts:
MastAttack: No, using the manual syringe/vial method is NOT the same as using an epinephrine autoinjector

SciBabe: WHY YOU SHOULDN’T USE THIS METHOD TO SAVE MONEY ON THE EPIPEN

Corn Free Travel (Reprise)

It’s getting to be my travel season again, and while I haven’t solved most of my problems, I’m at least getting better at working around them.

My last travel post was nearly a year ago, and was my first major trip since developing an intense sensitivity to corn, multiple food allerges, and becoming airborne sensitive:

Corn Free Travel: To Baltimore and Back Again

Since then I have traveled to:

  • Austin, Texas for the Housecore Horror Film Festival (yes, as in movies! But they didn’t serve popcorn so I could actually go!)
  • Oakland and San Francisco, CA (twice!)

My upcoming trips:

After a few trips like this, I am somewhat of an old hand at traveling. It doesn’t really get less awkward, but I just am more resigned to it. I refuse to quit living my life and doing things I enjoy just because my body is a jerk, so I am going to keep going through this effort and expense.

The topics covered in my previous post are still germane, and I still have a water problem that is not corn. I haven’t solved this water problem. I am still shipping my water ahead. Here’s a rundown of my travel “routine”:

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Don’t Panic: A Beginners’ Guide to Corn Allergy

So you’re allergic to corn.

First: Are you SURE you are allergic to corn? People often forge ahead with this as an assumption and in some cases, it might be best to question it, at least for a minute. As you will realize as you read the rest of this post, avoiding corn is not as simple as cutting a few foods from your diet. Corn is not only a food, it is a food additive, preservative, disinfectant, lubricant, emulsifier, anti-caking agent, and more. Not everyone has to avoid everything derived from corn, but for some reason more people have to avoid more derivatives than you’d ever expect.

If you’ve had an adverse reaction to a food, you should definitely avoid that food in the future. But if the food had many ingredients besides corn, it might be worth taking some time to think critically about whether the corn in the food was the problem or something else.

So before you start turning your life upside down: What gave you your diagnosis? Was it a scratch test? Those have false positives. Was it a blood test? Those don’t usually have false positives, but it could happen. Did you do a food challenge? What was the food you challenged? Any chance it was a possible allergen contaminant in the food other than corn?

Okay, so you’re SURE it’s corn that you’re allergic to. Now what?

The steps for dealing with a corn allergy are about the same no matter how severe your reactions are. But if you are having severe reactions, you need to follow sort of an accelerated schedule and get yourself out of crisis ASAP.

Symptoms of severe reactions include:

  • feeling of throat closing
  • rash over more than 25% of the body
  • difficulty breathing
  • loss of consciousness (including feelings of excessive sleepiness that you just can’t fight- getting to lay down before you pass out still counts as passing out!)
  • loss of motor coordination
  • extreme swelling of the eyes, lips, or anywhere else in the body
  • prolonged and or painful diarrhea/intestinal cramping
  • prolonged vomiting

Read more about the signs of anaphylaxis here on the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network. If you are having these kinds of reactions, you need to make drastic changes right NOW, get as corn free as possible to begin. Then maybe you can see how much you can tolerate adding in from the “corn lite” options. People with less severe reactions can sort of take their time instead of diving in head first.

Who This Guide Is For

This guide is written for people who are reacting a lot or reacting severely, because that’s the situation I just came from, but I think it can contain good advice for others.

Even if you aren’t currently in crisis, I don’t suggest that you start out by assuming that you aren’t very sensitive and don’t need to make many changes. Rather, I strongly suggest you aim for going completely corn free within 6 months, and *then* see how well you do with derivatives and traces. The reason I suggest this is that there are a number of symptoms people wouldn’t typically associate with an allergy or intolerance such as joint pain, mild GI distress, acid reflux, “random” mild rashes or itching, eye pain, fatigue, bouts of sleepiness, blood sugar highs and lows, and eczema, that can disappear with the elimination of corn, but that you wouldn’t realize are a reaction until you eliminate the offending food for a while and then reintroduce. All of these symptoms are indications of inflammation that are doing long term damage to your body, so it is in your best interest to eliminate those sources of inflammation so that you can heal.

Learn the Basics

The following article is a really good overview on the spectrum of allergies and sensitivities. Please read it right away to give yourself a good grounding in the basics before beginning your corn free journey: Inflammation – Allergies and Sensitivities on WomenToWomen.

Get Support

Join the Corn Allergy and Intolerance group on Facebook and/or Delphi Avoiding Corn forums. Preferably both, but often people like one better than another.

Stay Safe

  1. Figure out how to safely treat reactions.
  2. If you have the kind of severe reactions listed above, get a prescription for an EpiPen. If you have reactions that aren’t necessarily severe but are definitely a “true allergy” meaning hives, rashes, asthma, and other IgE symptoms, you may want to consider getting an EpiPen just in case. A bit more on “true allergies” vs intolerances. If your usual doctor won’t give you one, try the walk-in clinic. If they won’t give you one, skip directly to the “Get Your Doctor On Board” step and find someone who will write you a prescription. Learn when to use your epipen. The EpiPen 2-pak comes with a “training” pen and instructions on how to use. Read up on it before you need them and train at least one family member on how to use it as well.
  3. Read this emergency medicine info. Bookmark the mobile site and use the information to prepare your own ER docs.

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Advanced Corn Allergy Help: Tracking Down Mystery Reactions

Here’s the situation I was in a year ago: I had been corn and gluten free for 6 years, and thought I had it all figured out. Then suddenly I started having anaphylactic reactions to previously safe foods. I thought I must have a new allergen. In fact, I did have a few new allergens, but the one allergen that was causing the anaphylaxis was actually still corn. For many of the foods that I realized I was reacting to, I was able to eat another version of that food that was grown/processed without corn contamination.

If you know that you are allergic to corn, and find yourself reacting and confused because you think you are corn free, you may want to re-examine your food and household products for hidden corn. You may also have new allergens. It’s important for the sake of safety to examine all possibilities rather than dismissing any particular one without first exploring and testing.

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Up to $100 off on EpiPens 2-Packs!

Mylan is offering a “copay card” that can get you $100 off of the copay your EpiPen 2-Pack or EpiPen Jr. 2-Pack prescription. The cash price for each 2-pack is generally in the range of $200-$250, so this is a *significant* savings. The  offer is valid for up to three 2-packs per prescription.

To apply for the card, go to the Copay Card Activation Site,  fill out the form as instructed, and download and print your card. You can then begin using it right away. The card should have instructions for your pharmacist, and a number to call with questions.

Terms and Conditions of the program. 

The press release from Mylan on the program.

The offer expires December 31, 2013!