Currently Available Low-Cost Epipen Alternatives Are NOT Safe!

 

In an emergency, an manual draw epinephrine injection kit is NOT an appropriate replacement for an autoinjector.

Additionally, the syringe based auto injectors such as Adrenaclick are NOT an ideal sub for a cartridge based autoinjector!

A cartridge-based autoinjector is the SAFEST and most SURE way to save lives in an anaphylactic emergency, and carrying anything else could cost even more lives. As it is, fewer than half of patients in a 2015 study were able to correctly administer epiniphrine using the brand-name autoinjector.

  1. For people who are not medical professionals, draw time on a manual injection is too slow. Seconds count, and an average parent trying to inject their child takes two and a half minutes to draw up.
  2. If you have having even a moderate reaction you will be too compromised to inject yourself with a manual draw. Anyone who has ever fumbled around looking for their asthma inhaler, benadryl, or even car keys to get to those things, knows this from experience. Trying to draw up, remove air bubbles, and then *remove your pants* to inject yourself during anaphylaxis is out of the question.
  3. The syringe based auto injectors such as the adrenaclick may not deliver a sufficient dosage of epi.  The adrenaclick delivers only 25.7% of intended dose while the Epipen cartridge-based injector delivers 74.3%.
  4. Syringe based solutions, either manual or auto injection, cannot reliably be used through clothing. Thick clothing such as denim will bend the needle and must be removed or cut away, costing seconds that could be the difference between life and death.

Related posts:
MastAttack: No, using the manual syringe/vial method is NOT the same as using an epinephrine autoinjector

SciBabe: WHY YOU SHOULDN’T USE THIS METHOD TO SAVE MONEY ON THE EPIPEN

To Epi or Not to Epi?

If you haven’t read about Natalie Giorgi’s tragic death due to an allergic reaction already, catch up here. It’s a sobering story: her parents did everything right, yet she still died.


This article by Dr. Mark Greenwald
states that the problem is that the guidelines for epipen use are incorrect. His opinion is that if a patient has a known potential for anaphylaxis and a known or suspected exposure to the allergen, epi should be given, even if symptoms have not presented. He holds that the “wait and see” approach, despite being what is advised by the medical community, is what killed Natalie.

I don’t have much more to say about it at this time. I’ll just link you to the article to read. With most articles I advise that folks don’t read the comments because of the rampant stupid, but the ones I read from this article were actually as informative as the article itself. I didn’t read them all though, so my apologies if you scroll to the bottom and someone has said something just awful.

Tragic Loss of Sacramento Teen Reveals Flaws in Anaphylaxis Guidelines