What My Winter Prep Looks Like

I can only eat food from a few specific farmers so I have to put up what is growing when it’s growing if I want to eat in the winter. You can learn about why this is by skimming through my Hidden Corn laundry list  and reading some of my corn-tamination posts on individual foods. Because of other allergies, my “lockdown season” has been from November until June. One of my farmer-mommies began planting some winter crops I could eat so my lockdown is now from about January to June.

People frequently want to know what it looks like when you can’t just run out and buy food for half the year, so I took these pictures. What I have put up I will probably eat about 60-70% of this year, to myself. The large volume is mostly because I can’t eat any grains or starches due to not having safe sources. Corn is my anaphylactic and most sensitive allergy but I am also allergic to eggs, soy, and dozens of vegetables including all of the ones that grow in cold weather such as broccoli and cabbage.
PLEASE NOTE that the mason jar lids shown here are NOT safe for canning for most and may not be safe for frozen or dried storage for many. The BPA free canning lids from Ball and Kerr contain a resin that contains some corn. I personally can jar things with them but cannot have stuff that was canned (boiled in hot water for a long time) with them.

All of my preserved food is frozen or dehydrated because in addition to the Ball/Kerr canning lids containing a corny resin, I also do not seem to tolerate the Tattler canning lids. Not sure if this is a corn issue or not. I have not yet tried the Weck jars although I will eventually. More (but not enough) on corn-free canning here.

ANOTHER NOTE for people buying freezers- you want MANUAL DEFROST for any long term storage. “Frost Free” freezers are dehumidifiers which will eventually freeze dry your meat if it is not in a 100% airtight seal. My safe meat packaging is ziplocks, so those are not true hermetic seals at all.  I also observe, although the internet at large contradicts me, that frost free freezers contribute to MUCH faster freezer burn in all of my food.  I have meat in my manual defrost freezer from well over a year ago that is still totally fine, and it wouldn’t last nearly that long in a frost free freezer.

 

 

Clockwise from upper left:

  1. Dry storage & lactoferments: home dried & ground paprika, dried tomatoes, dried sweet & hot peppers, dried tomatoes, celery, more dried tomatoes, spicy pickled cucumbers & ancho peppers on to ferment still.
  2. 20 cubic foot upright freezer #1: Jars upon jars of fruit purees, tomato sauce, foodsaver vacuum-sealed bags of green veggies, pear sauce, a LOT of peaches, frozen grapes, and berries.
  3. 20 cubic foot upright freezer #2: Cucumber juice (yes really), more tomato sauce, fruit purees, more peaches, berries, and some pecans I never got around to shelling because they are a pain in the rear.
  4. 20 cubic foot chest freezer: These really are the best for fitting way more than the same cubic foot in an upright, not accidentally leaving open slightly & losing a bunch of food, and not building up with frost as quickly. However omg keeping them organized. I used the inserts that come with the freezer for the bottom part and then stacked these sterilite bins on top so i can easily remove the bins and see what’s below. best I can do for organizing.
  5. 4.4 Cubic Foot “all fridge” minifridge. This is my backstock mini-fridge. I unplug it when I don’t  need to store more produce than my regular fridge can hold. At the time of this picture it contains cucumbers I need to process still, and pickled veggies that are done fermenting.

How the Soaring Prices of Epipens Are Affecting Our Safety

There’s been a lot of buzz lately about the excessively high prices of the brand name Epipen autoinjector. In 2007, a single brand-name autoinjector was $50, and now it’s $300. And that’s just the wholesale price to the pharmacy. I’ve seen reports of pharmacies almost doubling that price and billing patients $1200 or more for a twin-pack.

You don’t need me to tell you that this price hike is unnecessary and unethical.

The medicine inside of the injector is about $1 per dose, but it’s not really the epi you’re paying for- it’s the delivery device. That however can’t possibly cost even close to $300 per pen, which is the minimum wholesale cost to pharmacies. (The pens only come in a twin-pack and should always be carried in pairs.) Obviously if at one time the price was only $50, the pens must cost some amount less than $50 to manufacture. I can understand that manufacturing costs rise over time, but I sincerely doubt that they rose by 600 percent. This is price gouging. It is unethical profit maximization at the expense of people–CHILDREN–who NEED the medication to stay ALIVE.

The “Low Cost” Alternatives Are NOT Safe Alternatives

Yes, it is THIS SPECIFIC medication and delivery device that we–and our allergic children and loved ones–need. This point is important enough to warrant its own post: In an emergency, an manual draw epinephrine injection kit is NOT an appropriate replacement for an autoinjector, and the syringe based auto injectors are NOT an appropriate sub for a cartridge based autoinjector!

  1. For people who are not medical professionals, draw time on a manual injection is too slow. Seconds count, and an average parent trying to inject their child takes two and a half minutes to draw up.
  2. Even if you are practiced at drawing and injecting, if you have having even a moderate reaction you may be too compromised to inject yourself with a manual draw. Anyone who has ever fumbled around looking for their asthma inhaler, benadryl, or even car keys to get to those things, knows this from experience. Trying to draw up, remove air bubbles, and then *remove your pants* to inject yourself during anaphylaxis is almost always out of the question.
  3. The syringe based auto injectors such as the adrenaclick may not deliver a sufficient dosage of epi.
  4.  Syringe based solutions, either manual or auto injection, cannot be used through clothing. Clothing must be removed or cut away, costing seconds that could be the difference between life and death.

The $0 Copay Card is Not a Solution

In response to the uproar over the increased Epipen pricing, Mylan announced they would “halve” the cost Firstly, the $0 copay card never was $0 copay. It was up to $100 off a twinpack, which would only be $0 if your copy was $100 or less. Secondly, it could not be used by anyone who didn’t have insurance, or who had Medicare/Medicaid. Thirdly, it was not legal in every state. In response to the outrage, Mylan raised the value of their coupon to $300, and that STILL isn’t good enough: Assuming you were even eligible to use the card, *someone* would be paying up to $300 for your epipen. If not you, then your insurance company.

Here is an article on WebMD about why the coupon isn’t truly saving us money.

The Generic Option is STILL Too Expensive

Back in February of this year, the only product comparable in ease of use to the Epipen, the Auvi-Q, was recalled due to potential dosage delivery issues. In April, it was announced that a new company would begin working on the delivery issues and try to put the Auvi Q back on the market. A few months later, Mylan hiked the price of their brand name product up by double.

Only three weeks after *that* Mylan announced release of their generic,  with a wholesale cost of $300, which is the same as the Epipen brand name before the price increase.  News rticles made it sound like the generic release was in response to the public outcry, but if it were reactionary and not planned, there is NO WAY they would have it ready to go only 3 weeks after the price hikes. They obviously anticipated the outcry and planned ahead how to respond.

To Put it Bluntly: This is F***ing Garbage

This was obviously planned, and obviously an attempt to maintain their profit margins in the face of possible competition. As I already said, it is price-gouging, and the victims are disabled people, and disabled CHILDREN.

I’ll spare you the detailed conspiracy theories. I’m not a journalist, just an allergy and chronic illness patient who’s trying to share some information with her fellow patients. I’ll link to a few articles with lots of information. Draw your own conclusions.

NPR: EpiPen’s Dominance Driven By Competitors’ Stumbles And Tragic Deaths

Chicago Tribune: How Mylan, the EpiPen company, maneuvered to create a virtual monopoly

Bloomberg: How EpiPen’s Price
Rose and Rose

Forbes: Why Did Mylan Hike EpiPen Prices 400%? Because They Could

 

Back To the Point: Do Not Risk Your Life on Low Cost Alternatives

Please, if have any other options, do not try to save money on an alternative to the Epipen that will put you or your loved ones’ life in danger. If you don’t have any other options and truly cannot afford an autoinjector that you *know* will deliver the correct dosage of the meds and that you can use reliably and correctly in an emergency, please ask for help affording one. If no one can help you, please, please, please tell me, tell the news station, tell everyone you can about it. I know that this doesn’t help you right now, but the more people hear about situations where people are literally risking their lives because they can’t afford life-saving medication, hopefully the more pressure Mylan will feel to correct their problems, and the more demand other companies will see for a functional and safe alternative.

Currently Available Low-Cost Epipen Alternatives Are NOT Safe!

 

In an emergency, an manual draw epinephrine injection kit is NOT an appropriate replacement for an autoinjector.

Additionally, the syringe based auto injectors such as Adrenaclick are NOT an ideal sub for a cartridge based autoinjector!

A cartridge-based autoinjector is the SAFEST and most SURE way to save lives in an anaphylactic emergency, and carrying anything else could cost even more lives. As it is, fewer than half of patients in a 2015 study were able to correctly administer epiniphrine using the brand-name autoinjector.

  1. For people who are not medical professionals, draw time on a manual injection is too slow. Seconds count, and an average parent trying to inject their child takes two and a half minutes to draw up.
  2. If you have having even a moderate reaction you will be too compromised to inject yourself with a manual draw. Anyone who has ever fumbled around looking for their asthma inhaler, benadryl, or even car keys to get to those things, knows this from experience. Trying to draw up, remove air bubbles, and then *remove your pants* to inject yourself during anaphylaxis is out of the question.
  3. The syringe based auto injectors such as the adrenaclick may not deliver a sufficient dosage of epi.  The adrenaclick delivers only 25.7% of intended dose while the Epipen cartridge-based injector delivers 74.3%.
  4. Syringe based solutions, either manual or auto injection, cannot reliably be used through clothing. Thick clothing such as denim will bend the needle and must be removed or cut away, costing seconds that could be the difference between life and death.

Related posts:
MastAttack: No, using the manual syringe/vial method is NOT the same as using an epinephrine autoinjector

SciBabe: WHY YOU SHOULDN’T USE THIS METHOD TO SAVE MONEY ON THE EPIPEN